Category Archives: Activites

Moon Phases: Using a Flashlight, Balls, Oreos, Spaceships (okay, maybe not spaceships)

IMG_0214Oreo Moon Phases using Oreo’s is my most favoritest (not a real word) Science Activities. There are so many awesome blogs that have used the glorious cookie and they would be useful for older kiddos. Since mine are 5 years and under I had to simplify the phases by only teaching 4 of them. Full moon (not the backside form), Last Quarter, First Quarter, and New Moon. 

 

Additional Moon Info:

NASA link about the moon

 

 

Moon monster gobbling up the moon.

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Junior moon monster eating the cream part of the moon.


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Another way to learn about moon phases is using a flashlight and balls. Here is a NASA link for another way to show moon phases as well.

Non-edible Moon Phases Activity

The earth: Big blue ball

The moon: Small white ball

The Sun: flashlight.

Space: Dark room

I started by asking questions to my son like:

1) Why is the moon so bright? (The light from the sun)

2) Why does the moon change? (Orbiting around the earth, earth orbiting the sun)

If you hold the moon (white ball) around the other side of the earth (blue ball) you can get a shadow to cast on the white ball. How the picture is below technically shows a Solar ellipse because the moon is lined up with the earth and sun and the moon is blocking the light. To show moon phases move the moon (white ball) behind the earth to cast a shadow on the moon.

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Bb and Dd reversal game.

IMG_1897 IMG_1898More Bb and Dd reversal fun.

Tape 4 squares on the floor and add the uppercase and lowercase b’s and d’s. We used colorful duct tape.

Bb/Dd Game:

Parent: Yells out “Lowercase d, Uppercase B, etc.”

Child jumps on the letter the parent calls out.

Good times. 🙂

Previous Post: Includes articles about Bb/Dd reversal

 

 

Colorful Ooey-gooey Mess-free Handwriting Practice (and Bb/Dd Reversal)

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Colorful Ooey-Gooey Mess-free Handwriting Practice:

Step 1: Print off or hand-write Practice Sheets

Step 2: Fill a gallon baggie with colorful goo and close bag.

Step 3: Place baggie over sheet (Don’t put sheet in bag or the paper will get mushy)

(Tape it down if the bag moves too much)

Colorful Goo: 

Options:

1) Cool whip/Whipping cream with food coloring

2) Liquid Soap with food coloring

3) Clear shampoo with food coloring

-Child can use their finger or a pen with the lid still on.

 

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2 year old brother “Doing school” with 4.5 yr old brother who is actually doing school. 🙂

 

Oldest is working on Bb and Dd since he mixes up the lower case letters of b and d.

Great articles on Bb and Dd reversals from:

All about Learning

Logic of English

 

 

 

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Family History Activity

Baby RolandYour kids are never too young to hear about family stories. My 3.5 yr old went through a faze of wanting to play camping trip every day. We would get out our sleeping bags and make a tent out of sheets and chairs. I should include that “faze” maybe the wrong word since I still have to pretend to camp every day. These pretend camping adventures brought me back to when I was a little girl and went camping with my family. I started to tell my son all the different camping stories I remembered. His favorite one I tell is about when my dad, mom, brother, and I were camping in a tent at a campground. A storm came and it started to sprinkle, then rain, then lightning, then thunder, then downpour. The tent buckled under the weight of the pond-sized puddle on top and it came down on us. My 5’11’ mom used her pole-sized leg to hold the tent up (my dad was 5’8”). This story always makes my son laugh.

Activity 1: Sit down with your kids and look through old family albums. Tell them stories you remember as your look through the pictures. Look through their baby book with them and tell them stories about when they were babies. Make a journal of memories so you can give them to your children someday.

Activity 2: Have your child ask grandparent’s and even great-grandparent’s questions and record the answers in a notebook or album. Here are some examples of questions they could ask:

1) What kind of games did you play when you were little?

2) Did you play any instruments?

3) What were your parents like? What memories do you have of them?

4) What kind of holiday traditions did your family celebrate?

5) What was your favorite place to visit?

6) Favorite story involving a sibling.

7) Favorite recipes: include copies in the album

8) What kind of jobs did you have?

9) Happiest day of your life?

10) Worse day of your life?

This website lets you type in your last name to see where it came from. http://genealogy.familyeducation.com/family-names-surnames/meaning-origin

Pictured above: My grandpa as a baby. Wasn’t he cute? 🙂

Chores: What is a good age to start?

IMG_0004I have a 3 1/2 yr old and a 1 1/2 yr old. I am not a parenting expert and I won’t pretend to be. I go by experience and not by a prestigious degree. If I had gone to college for a prestigious degree in parenting I would have been laughed at because there is no such thing. So what is a good age to start assigning chores? I have no idea! What I do with our kids is let them help me and encourage their participation in what I’m doing. I’m doing the dishes so I pull up a chair and encourage them to help me wash and rinse dishes. I’m vacuuming, I give them the attachment to get under the couches. I’m sorting laundry, I yell at them to stop messing up my piles. My young children have more of an assist-mommy chore list, but since they are so little they get to do the chore than is best suited for them: Play!

What do you all think is a good age to start chores?

Felt Food that you can Feel

IMG_6313IMG_6309Felt Food

Cut felt into food shapes. I made 1 orange, 2 slices of bread, 3 lettuce slices, 4 slices of cheese, 5 pices of bacon, and 6 grapes. This is a fun way to teach counting and it is the only food that is exceptable to play with! 🙂

The play mat is a Melissa and Doug color mat.

The Colorful Balloons Game

IMG_7088 The Balloon Color Game:

Blow up many different colors of balloons. Place scotch tape upside down in a band around the hand taping it to itself. Then yell out a color. Your child(ren) will try to stick as many balloons of that color onto their hands. The one with the most balloons wins. Great way to teach colors and to learn counting.

Variation: try scotch tape on other areas of the body like a leg, foot, or rear-end to make it more of a challenge. Don’t use duct-tape or stronger tape or it will pop the balloons when you try to take the balloon off.

Mr. Funny Felt Face

Mr. Funny Felt Face is a fantastically fun way to for little ones to figure out parts of their face. 🙂

I cut out felt and as I lay it down I would touch the corresponding body part. I’d say “eye” and then touch his eye. Okay, maybe it was more his eyelid that I touched than eye.

I love how he put Mr. Funny Face together. Future Picasso?

A Children’s Game I Made Up When I Was Bored.

I love workbooks and activity sheets to teach my kids numbers, letters, colors, etc. But for the most part when you have little ones they don’t want to just sit in a chair and work quietly on a sheet of paper. So as I sat there and watched my 3-year-old continue to get into mischief I decided he needed to play a game. We have been working on numbers so it was going to be a number game. I saw post-it notes sitting next to the desk and a marker so I wrote the numbers: 3,5,7,9. I stuck each number to a different wall and had my son stand in the middle of the room. When I called out a number he would have to run to the wall and get to it before I did. If you have multiple kids this would really be a fun game, except my 13 month old didn’t really understand the rules. If you have older children you could yell out addition or subtraction problems and they would have to run to the answer. So many possibilities.

Scrabble for Kids

Scrabble for Kids:

My son really wanted to play with our Scrabble game the other day so we made up a 3-year-old version. I would yell out a letter and he would have to find all the tiles with that letter on it. Afterwards, he would count how many letters he found to get points. If you don’t have a scrabble game you could use Boggle or another letter game or just cut out pieces of paper and write letters on them. What is not fun about this game is when the 3-year-old beats you.